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Fannie Mae Frequently Asked Questions


Did you remember that Fannie Mae maintains a “Frequently Asked Questions” feature on its website. It was last updated May 15, 2015. It is only 11 pages with 46 questions. I highly recommend that you take a look at it. I bet you will find helpful information on it that you never knew before.

The following are a few of the FAQ’s:

Q7. Why does Fannie Mae require the lender to provide the sales contract to the appraiser?
Fannie Mae’s policy is intended to help ensure that the appraiser is aware of all relevant aspects of the transaction. The sales contract provides important sales and financing data, including whether there are any concessions as part of the transaction. If the contract is amended, the lender must provide the updated contract to the appraiser to ensure that the appraiser has been given the opportunity to consider any changes and their effect on value. If the appraiser determines that there is no impact to value, then no additional commentary is required from the appraiser.

Q11. Is it acceptable for an appraiser to obtain and provide the required interior photographs at the time of the inspection for the Appraisal Update and/or Completion Report (Form 1004D)?
Yes. If the property being appraised is proposed or at a stage of construction where the required photographs cannot be obtained, they may be obtained at the time of the inspection for the Certification of Completion and provided with the Form 1004D.

Q12. If an appraiser provides an Appraisal Update and reports an increased value, can the lender utilize the value increase to underwrite the loan in process?
No. The purpose of the Appraisal Update portion of the Form 1004D is to indicate whether the value has remained the same or decreased. If the value has increased, the lender would need to obtain a new appraisal that reflects the increase in value in order to utilize the higher appraised value in underwriting the loan.

Q17. Are the trends that are reported on the Market Conditions Addendum to the Appraisal Report (Form 1004MC) the same trends that are to be reported in the One-Unit Housing Trends section of the appraisal report (Form 1004)?
Yes. The conclusions regarding trends that are obtained from the Form 1004MC must be the same trends reported in the Neighborhood trends section of the Form 1004. The information reported on both forms must be consistent to provide the lender with a clear and accurate understanding of the market trends and conditions present in the subject neighborhood, based on properties that are considered competitive with the subject being appraised.

Q19. Will Fannie Mae accept a loan for which the lender has requested the appraiser to appraise only a portion of a larger piece of property?
No. Fannie Mae expects that the appraisal will reflect the value attributable to the entire property. It is important for the underwriter and Fannie Mae to fully understand the value of the entire property that is serving as security for the loan.

Q23. Are loans secured by unique or non-traditional homes eligible for delivery to Fannie Mae?
Yes. Fannie Mae does purchase loans secured by unique or non-traditional housing types, such as, but not limited to, log homes, earth berm homes, and geodesic domes, which can be located in all areas, including rural locations. Loans on these types of properties are eligible for delivery to Fannie Mae provided the appraiser has adequate information to develop a reliable opinion of market value.

Q30. What is expected with regard to the appraiser’s inspection of a property?
Fannie Mae requires that the appraiser conduct a complete visual inspection of the accessible areas of the interior and exterior of the property. The appraiser is responsible for noting in his/her report any adverse conditions (such as, but not limited to, needed repairs; deterioration; or the presence of hazardous wastes, toxic substances, or adverse environmental conditions) that were apparent during the inspection of the property or that he/she became aware of during the research involved in performing the appraisal. The appraiser is expected to consider and describe the overall condition and quality of the property and identify items that require immediate repair as well as items where maintenance may have been deferred and which may not require immediate repair. On the other hand, an appraiser is not responsible for hidden or unapparent conditions. In addition, Fannie Mae does not consider the appraiser to be an expert in all fields, such as environmental hazards. In situations where an adverse property condition may be observed by the appraiser but the appraiser is not qualified to decide whether that condition requires immediate repair (such as the presence of mold, an active roof leak, settlement in the foundation, etc.), the property must be appraised subject to an inspection by a qualified professional. In such cases, the lender may need to ask the appraiser to update his or her appraisal based on the results of the inspection, in which case the appraiser would incorporate the results of the inspection and measure the impact, if any, on his or her final opinion of market value.

Q33. Can the appraiser use comparable sales that closed over twelve months ago?
Yes. The best and most appropriate sales may not always be the most recent. A sale more than 12 months old may be more appropriate in situations when market conditions have impacted the availability of recent sales as long as the appraiser reflects the changing market conditions. Additionally, older comparable sales that are the best indicator of value for the subject property can be used if they are appropriate. For example, if the subject property is located in a rural area that has minimal sales activity, the appraiser may not be able to locate three truly comparable sales that sold within the last twelve months. In this case, the appraiser may use older comparable sales as long as he or she explains why they are being used.